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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
been posted by the "washington post" for tomorrow, and saying that it had become a distraction, that she wants to focus on her work and that clearly was not possible the way this had proceeded. i think that no one asked her to withdraw but they were unable, since she had not been nominated and the president was still obviously ambivalent between her and john kerry at this stage, they did not surround her with the kind of support she would have had if she had been a nominee. i think it's very clear from our reporting and from chuck todd's reporting that some of the top advisers in the white house, they were divided also, but some of the top advisers said to the president you do not need this political battle right now with the republican senate because this would stretch the benghazi investigation forever and it would mean that the confirmation hearing would be very difficult. they probably could have won it. but that it would be a distraction from the main act, which is to move on, create a cabinet, have a national security team and focus on the tax and spending debate, which i
'm not going to say it. >> you are in our hearts. you can tell us what's going on in washington. what's going on in washington? >> bad dynamics. >> really? >> those of us optimistic there'd be a deal. the white house has blasted boehner's offer as much as the republicans blasted the president's. people like to say, oh, they're going to posture, but behind the scenes they're working it out. they're not. >> i hear chuck todd reported yesterday behind the scenes a top aide to barack obama, willie geist. and this -- i don't -- i'm not really good at reading the tea leaves. maybe this is good, maybe this is bad. but a top obama aide yesterday told chuck todd that if the republicans -- if these republicans were in power when abraham lincoln were there, there would still be slavery. does that help the process move along? or does it hurt? i don't really know -- >> reading between the lines. >> i know one direction, i know boy bands. >> reading between the lines, that's probably a bad omen. we do have four weeks, though. >> that's bad. >> absolutely. we have, i believe, we have 27 negotiating days. un
for staying with us for the next hour. do you want to know what just happened tonight in washington? do you want to know what just happened, with congress just unexpectedly imploding and the republicans in congress dissolving into a huge internal fight, including screaming matches within their own caucus and all of a sudden they're just turning off the light and abandoning what they were doing and nobody really knows why and nobody knows what happens next? do you want to know how we got here and why this just happened and why it's reallhere. okay? this is jim demint. jim demint was re-elected senator for south carolina not this past election, 2012, but in 2010. you might remember he was the guy who had the good fortune in 2010 to be running against a young man named alvin green on the democratic side. it was not a hotly contested race. mr. did emint won by 34 points. and that freed him up to spread a bunch of his own campaign cash and his own energy that year on other campaigns and other candidates that he favored. and that has been the way that jim demint has built his influence in politic
to go before america goes over a fiscal cliff. an outcome looking more likely every hour. washington's willingness to take america to the brink threatens its prosperity. i'm ali velshi. this is "your money." the latest negotiations comes down to useless symbolic moves and haggling between grown men. put bluntly, your elected officials are wasting time while the clock ticks. house speaker john boehner announced his plan b to let bush-era tax cuts expire for earners making more than a million dollars a year. and he wants to replace automatic cuts in defense spending set to start early next year with unspecified cuts elsewhere. the speaker pulled his so-called plan b for lack of support from his own party because many republicans still beholden to grover norquist and that ridiculous pledge want no compromise at all. the debate between the two sides centers around a balanced approach to the budget. republicans say president obama wants too much revenue. that's taxes in normal speak. and not enough cuts. >> at some point we have to address the spending problem we have. we can't cut our wa
with washington. >> first of all, congressman, you threw out a number there, there are a lot of numbers that can confuse people. you talk about $31 billion. the reality is, over 10 years, based on documents i have seen from republicans, raising the top rates would get you over $400 billion in new revenue. so that is a fact that both sides agree on. >> david, in two months of this new pacific northwe new fiscal year, you have $10 billion in revenue but 16% increase in spending. it is a spending problem. and the president wants to increase taxes to continue the spending. he proposed a plan that put a new spend list in that added more than just the top two rates' worth in the first year. that's the problem with washington. >> and i want to get to the spending and the entitlement question in just a moment, but i want to stay on tax rates for one minute. congressman, there are members of your own party who are saying privately, some publicly, just fold on the tax rates so that conservatives can get a better deal. just this week on "morning joe" on msnbc, here is tom coburn, republican conservative fr
the fiscal cliff. events moving faster in washington. house speaking boehner meeting with party members, moving to plan b. that deals with bush era tax cuts. the white house rejected that. investors like whatever progress we're seeing. s&p 500 at a two-month high. s&p up 1 1/3 -- 1.1 on s&p, dow jones industrial average up 114 points, almost a full% enand nasdaq up 1 1/3. the latest on how those negotiations are progressing. >> over the last 24 hours or so we've had a flurry of proposals, counter proposals, responses, responses to responses. as it lies right now, basically all those responses have been rejected by the other side. at the top of 2:00, we should have a new round because we're going to expect to hear from the senate democratic and republican leaders coming out and talking to cameras. we might get more reaction then. but earlier today speaker boehner came out and unveiled the big one, a two-track plan that would have the house vote on what he's calling plan b. take a listen to his rational for going that route. >> at this point having a back-up plan to make sure that as few
are down 11 points on the dow jones. that's hinging on disappointment from washington. the nasdaq is up two and a third point. my partner here on the floor of nyse joins me in the action. 24 hours ago we were sitting here with a triple-digit gain, actually. now, there is disappointment in washington. >> let's just say the markets are digesting all of this news today, that means moving side ways, a fancy word, folks. we are talking like 30 points. that pretty small. and the president sounding alternative sounding con ciliatory and often combative as you hear from john harwood. here is the bottom line. big movers, bank stocks, home moving stocks, that sue just referenced. all basically flat today. if you take a look at the one sector though that is still continuing to have a great day, doing it day after day and that's airline stocks, very positive traffic metrics from airlines in the last few weeks and these stocks have been moving up virtually everyday. there is your market today. this is a quiet day when you see airlines as the market leader. >> true. good point. we will see what happens w
clinton and left washington. she resumd her princeton professorship and life in new jersey with her husband and two teenaged sons. in the wake of her departure, slaughter wrote a cover story for the atlantic magazine. why women still can't have it all. within days the piece became the most read in the atlantic's 150-year history. over 1 million views in the first week alone. tonight she takes us behind that personal decision that became a raging public debate. explain the intensity of that kind of job because it's really much more than what many people think. this is a more intense job than very senior jobs in the private sector. >> it's comparable. it's an assistant secretary-level job. you're on pretty much all the time. you're the head of the secretary of state's private think tank. that means you cover the entire world, just as she does. you're on for everything she needs you to do and the longer-term planning. you work pretty much around the clock. >> you're working probably six days a week. >> i commuted back every weekend because i had to be with my kids in princeton every we
. i want to get to washington with some of the latest headlines regarding speaker boehner and what eamon is referring to as plan b. >> what we know is the speaker is in the basement of the capital building here right now, meeting with republican lawmakers to brief them on the status of the fiscal cliff negotiation, and what a gop leadership aide is now telling news news is the speaker is now prepared to offer what he's calling a plan b, or a modified plan b in which we don't do the grand big deal that the president and speaker of the negotiating on, but instead do something much smaller that would eliminate the pending tax increases for all americans, the speaker saying that he would like to have some kind of a deal, a modified scaled-down proposal now that would eliminate those for as many people as he can. the details are very sketchy on what modified plan b actually means in practice. but basically, it's something he can keep in his hip pocket right now in case these negotiations with the president don't bear fruit. and presumably what we're talking about here, carl, is a little
-year, and this, when we used to go and see greenspan down in washington, he said everything else you have on your ticker, i need to see the 10 year. i need to see that every morning. nothing has happened in the ten year for the last -- i don't know. it's just not as interesting as it used to be to watch. when it's manipulated, it's not that interesting. >> one of the things about qe is that it's volatility. and you have seen implied vols down in all asset classes, including bonds. >> because things normally are volatile, that just shows us once again this is not letting things -- letting the chips fall where they may. >> yeah. i think it's baked into the cake. >> but i think he's on to something. the fact that the fed is there, the fact that the fed is trying to get ahead of the fiscal cliff and we've got these big bond buying programs. and the last time, remember, in august of 2011 when we had the last showdown, what happened? bonds rallied. >> and you said you want this to be fixed. you almost need the markets to be more volatile than they are. >> that's one of the theories that people have thr
of credit to the fed, perhaps, but also feel the debate shifted yesterday in washington. i began to hear way too many people say, you know what the president is curiously unengaged when it comes to cuts. i have always felt the president had the upper hand in this debate. i listened to bernanke and bernanke says, listen, i know they aren't going to come to deal. i see a lot of republicans on air saying we start to understand what they are they want as cuts. not hearing anything from the president. made me feel grim about the fiscal cliff, good about what the fed wants to do, very grim about the power of the fed, beyond what it's already done. >> the "wall street journal"/nbc news poll of americans about the fiscal cliff, some very interesting findings, just to that point, jim, two-thirds polled want congress to strike a deal and cut the budget, even if that means social security and medicare cuts. so, according to this poll, the people are saying, yes, go ahead, cut entitlements and say that obama has a mandate, among those that did not vote for obama, they have -- that they say that there is
like gospel. >> a veteran foreign correspondent first reported his story in "the washington post" and later wrote a book about his life. >> he had no compass by which to judge his behavior. >> he had a compass but the compass was the rules of the camp. the only compass he had. and it was only when he was 23 when he met somebody from the outside that that started to change. >> when he met park? >> when he met park. >> park was a new prison shin says he met while working at camp 14's textile factory. unlike shin, park had seen the outside world. he lived in pyongyang and traveled in china and he began to tell shin what life was like on the other side of the fence. >> translator: i paid most attention to what kind of food he ate outside the camp. >> what kind of food had he eaten? >> translator: a lot of different things. chicken, barbecue pig. the most important thing was the thought that even a prisoner like me could eat chicken and pork if i were able to escape the bashed wires. >> i've heard people define freedom in many ways. i've never heard it defined as broiled chicken. >> t
quickly here. john harward in washington here today. thanks a lot. the cheddar, bacon, onion sandwich that boosted sales for mcdonald's in december. >> steve liesman's exclusive interview with richmond fed president jeffrey lacquer. the lone dissenter at every fed policy meeting this year. more "squawk on the street" after this. the . >>> all right. if the sight of this sandwich makes your mouth water, then you are in luck. because the mcrib is back at mcdonald's today. but how much do limited time offers really impact on sales? we're here to break down the mcrib effect. ladies, great to have you with us. rachel, i'll start off with you. what sort of impact could we see potentially in the month of december? i read in the past, in 2010 at least, one of these limited introduction offers that it actually boosted sales by almost 5%. >> i think it depends on what the lto is and what the prior year same-store comparison is. i wouldn't expect to see a positive number of the magnitude that you're discussing. actually, frankly, it will probably be something in the single digit negatives. but a
this young woman in seeking, finding, killing osama bin laden. in this new report from "the washington post," this mystery cia operative has a very complicated life, even more so after the bin laden raid. joining me from washington is greg miller, the intelligence reporter with the post, with "the washington post." welcome. >> thanks. >> what an article. i read it and from what i can tell, and also listen to an interview with catherine bigelow. this cia operative found the link to the courier to drive this forward to find osama bin laden. who is she? what do you know? >> she's in her 30s. she's a young female targeter for the agency, a targeter is a job in what she is supposed to find weaknesses in terrorist networks, look for nodes, people that can be recruited by the cia or people that could be hit by drones. and she played, as you said, a huge role in the hunt for osama bin laden. and focused on the idea that he depended on a network of couriers to hand deliver his messages. she believed from very early on that that would be the trail that would ultimately lead to the al qaeda chief. >>
coverage live from washington. mission critical, rise above d.c., all day long. becky quick, jim cramer, maria bartiromo holding their feet to the fire about where they stand on the fiscal cliff and how they'll do their part to rise above partisan politics and reach a deal. now, there are some bowles comments. 40%, yeah, but the odds are much better. they're still 35% chance it will not happen. it's not exactly confidence building. >> not necessarily confidence building. always interesting to me how people can put percentage chances on anything like this. seeing how difficult it is and how the story changes to a certain steextent each day. who knows what's going to happen. >> public care, confidence numbers, spending, any relationship to the fiscal cliff at five. >> i don't know. i just don't know. i think anecdotally, from what i have been able to observe, no. but i can't speak for that. the journal today has the lead stories of consumer spending starting so slow. and in part, they cite the fiscal cliff. i think if you were out there, you would get answers that would not necessarily de
reported shin's story in "the washington post" and later wrote a book about his life. he had no compass to judge his behavior. >> he had a compass, but the compass were the rules of the camp. and it was only when he was 23, when he met somebody from the outside, that that started to change. >> when he met park. park was a prisoner that he met in camp 14 east textile factory. he had seen the outside world. he lived in pyongyang and traveled in china. he begin to tell shin what life was like on the other side of the fence. >> translator: i paid most attention to what kind of food he ate outside the camp. >> what kind of food had he eaten? >> translator: a lot of things. chicken, barbecue pig. the most important thing was the thought that even a prisoner like me could eat chicken and pork, if i were able to escape the barbed wires. >> i heard people define freedoms in many ways. i never heard someone define it as broiled chicken. >> translator: i still think of freedom in that way. >> really? that's what freedom means to you? >> translator: people can eat what they want. it can be the grea
out of washington. but before we get to that, why don't we start with our day anticipates top story. the i.c.e. and the nyse are in talks. the numbers put the price tag at about $8 billion. >> we watched this -- now, you said you were watching this last night with kudlow, right? >> i did. >> did you think david faber? did you think when was book ending? on this, it went up last night. i don't know why this chart is showing no movement. it went up six points. >> yeah, right. >> that wouldn't even bring those -- because we watched. faber was talking about that last night. >> maybe if we show the prior day. >> that was the prior day. >> there's a glitch or something. >> that was the prior day that didn't show the after hours trading card. it was right about 720 been i think, wasn't it? >> and all this followed and it's a big story. >> well, it is. it's interesting because it's nyse euronext. >> and this isn't the first time that i.c.e. did this. >> no. you will are ebb that i.c.e. made a joint unsuccessful bid for control of the nyse last year. when the two withdrew their offers, they
if they don't do their job in washington. we're obviously concerned about it. if they deal with it, which we think they will. we think that next year should be pretty positive. >> meanwhile big party tonight? >> big party tonight, big party last night. >> that's what the city's all about. >> we'll be opening white plains in may, it will be a little warmer than it was up there last night. it's very exciting to see those hotels get done. 1,000 jobs for the city. >> you see at the bottom of your screen, nat gas inventory. >> listen natural gas prices are extending their gains from yet, after that 4% rally that we saw. we're looking at resistance perhaps around the 4.75 level. we saw a natural gas level that was certainly not what analysts were expectings. 65 billion cubic feet which is much greater than what the consensus was. that was between 64 and 68 million cubic feet. but it's also far greater than what we normally see this time of year. greater than last year's withdrawal. greater than the five-year average and it lets you know that we saw much cooler temperatures last week that certainly
of the rate that high workers are. we don't want to draw the best and most skilled workers in washington. >> it is interesting to me, people seem to know this. 67% of us think that the people in the private sector work harder than those in the public sector. the federal workforce has more machine money. we are supposed to be having budget cuts. why isn't anyone looking for it. this is one of the areas where republicans have pushed for spending restraint. there is a lot of money here. federal workers outside of the military cost us $240 billion a year. 100,000 beurocrats in the department of agriculture. let's privatize a lot of it. half a million people work for the post office. let the private sector figure it out. >> president obama has hired 143,000 federal workers since he took office. >> i don't think anybody knew that. >> thank you to chris edwards. i appreciate it. that is it for tonight's show. thank you for watching. we will be back tomorrow evening with much more.
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)